By John B. Butt

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Extra resources for Activation, Deactivation, and Poisoning of Catalysts

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The LHHW models which we shall choose as examples will be relatively simple and should be familiar to catalytic chemists. Simple models are chosen for two reasons: first, a general mathematical framework for rep­ resenting these ideas would be unnecessarily complex and cumbersome to follow; second, the purpose of these examples is to reveal general principles of the implications of deactivation processes rather than the more familiar mechanistic considerations and this is more easily accomplished by using simple models.

Soc. 82, 2471 (1960). P. A. Sermon and G. C. Bond, Catal. Rev. 8, 211 (1973). M. Shelef, K. Otto, and N. C. Otto, Adv. Catal. 27, 311 (1978). S. Szepe and O. Levenspiel, Chem. React. , Proc. Eur. , 4th, 1968, p. 265 (1971). T. Uchijima, J. M. Herrmann, Y. Inoue, R. L. , J. B. Butt, and J. B. Cohen, J. Catal. 50, 464(1977). R. Van Hardeveld and F. Hartog, Surf. Sei. 15, 189 (1969); Adv. Catal. 22, 76 (1972). A. Wheeler, in "Catalysis" (P. H. ), Vol. 2, p. 105. Reinhold, New York, 1955. 11. 12. 13.

C,·, T) =f(c„ T) (2-1) When we consider deactivating systems, Eq. (2-1) represents the initial reaction rate, that is, [ reaction rate of catalyst initially. lo=A(ci9T) (2-2) If, now, after some deactivation of the catalyst has occurred, the rate of the main reaction is measured again at the same values of the concentrations and temperature to obtain ^"reaction rate ofl catalyst after = Mt=f2(ci9T) L deactivation J (2-3) it is convenient then to define the activity as a^mt/m0 (2-4) Thus the activity is an operational parameter of considerable utility in characterizing the changes in the reaction rate of a catalyst as it deactivates, and it is obtained easily and directly from the experimental results.

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